Oh England!

I’m sorry for my longish absence without warning and for trying to catch up with your posts (you may have noticed all the ‘likes’). I had to give up half way because I had left it for too long and they were too many posts to read up. I’m really sorry about that. Instead,  I am more determined than ever to get an e-reader. After Google Reader was discontinued, I didn’t bother importing all my favorite blogs onto a software. Is there any particular app you prefer? I’ve heard great things about Feedly.

I’ve also decided that apart from a few scheduled posts in the Summer, blogging regularly and homeschooling and traveling is all a bit too much to handle together. I’m going to have to make a list of priorities and see them through instead of stressing myself out with too many goals.

Meanwhile, you know that sadness you feel when you leave some place stunning and just want to return to it? I’m feeling that right now. The English countryside is beautiful, the weather was (thankfully) perfect and the fact that we had no internet or phone connections except during some parts of the day made it an ideal retreat. We also manage to go to the coast and find Nemo. The kids were obviously over the moon. I wonder how much of this they will remember!

I will leave you with photo highlights of our trip. Until next time!

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Does Travel Negatively Affect a Childs Education?

Our Global Unschool Adventure

We found this post writtten last week by Caz makepeace from Y Travel Blog really sums up how we feel about our children’s education. Simon and I took our children out of school intentionally to travel and learn with them. I was once a teacher in a classroom frustrated by the direction of the Australian Curriculum, and the negative effects of standardised testing. It frustrated me even more when I saw my kids loosing interest in learning, and losing confidence. Our decision to travel with the kids has meant that we do very little of what would be considered normal ‘school work’, and yet we are watching our children grow in confidence and learn every day. At the end of the day, learning is something you should never stop doing, and enthusiasm should be celebrated and encouraged. Who gives a crap about test results?

Does Travel Negatively Affect a Childs…

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teach them to read

shift

photo copy 2..
Thought for the day, and week, and month, I suppose, at the rate I’ve been blogging:

If you want children to write, teach them to read. If you want them to read, show them reading is fun. As a kid, I was a bookworm, but it wasn’t until I became a teacher that I realized how much reading had impacted my understanding of the structure of the English language. No one cares about adverbs and subjects and predicates and helping verbs. No 8-year-old wants to break that stuff down. What they want are action and adventure and ideas. What they want are the things of life.

Except for that one student. If you really think “will” + “not” = “willn’t,” we may have a problem . . . Except that, there, the study of grammar failed you, too. You wouldn’t have said “willn’t” in day-to-day speech. You were…

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Subtraction game ideas to teach the concepts of ‘difference’ and ‘take away’

Before I start, I’d like to apologize for my blog silence. I tried to schedule as many posts as I could but some of them got lost in the maze that is the internet. I was away on vacation with the family to England (Photos up soon I promise!). What I have learnt in the past few weeks is that clichés are clichés for a reason. You know when people say they need a vacation to recover from a vacation? Oh boy is it true! Meanwhile, I have been able to write this post on Math because homeschooling doesn’t have terms. It’s an ongoing process! :) Hope you are all well. I will catch up with all your blogs soon! 

Experiencing difficulty in learning subtraction is a very common problem early in schools because students fail to move beyond the not-so-foolproof counting strategies of subtraction taught at kindergarten level. A simple solution lies in explaining the concept of subtraction to kids as both ‘take away’ and ‘difference’, helping them to understand the concept clearly. ‘Difference’ can be explained as comparing two numbers while ‘taking away’ can be explained as ‘removing numbers from a larger series of numbers’. M&M candies, cookies, chocolate squares, buttons, cookies, Lego blocks, cheerios, and marshmallows have always been very efficient tools in teaching kids the ‘difference’ and ‘taking away’ concepts. However, when I am not time bound and the kids are eager to learn, I play a few subtraction games with them in order to help them master the concept.

Flip flop math explaining ‘difference’

I stumbled upon this cool subtraction game on Pinterest when I was researching for general math game ideas for my 2 1st graders at home. I improvised on the game suggested by The Teacher’s Cauldron and came up with my own! This is a subtraction game that will help them understand the idea of ‘difference’. You will need a fair collection of sea shells, card stock, plastic laces, glue, scissors, markers, and 2 large sheets of construction paper. Distribute the shells unevenly among the kids and make multiple teams of 2 children each. The idea is to compare the number of sea shells and make a flip flop craft out of their ‘analysis’. If two girls in a team got 6 and 1 shells respectively, they cut out two flip flop bases and write their names on them. Next, have them write the number of shells they got on the flip flop next to their name. Paste the flip flops on the large construction paper and write the ‘difference’ in the space between their flip flops. Follow the image and replace the names with the answers and the addition problems with the number of shells each girl/boy got. Make several such pairs of flip flops for each team. Help them make the straps with the plastic laces and their flip flop craft is ready to go on the soft board.

Burning game explaining ‘take away’

This is a magic math game for kids of 2nd grade. It’s a twist to regular boring games, but must only be tried with necessary precautions in place!

You will need a mix of 3 portions of lemon juice and 1 portion of water, cotton swabs, a candle, a matchbox, papers, and markers to play the subtraction game in the class. Write an addition problem, like in the image, on strips of construction paper.  The only thing that you need to do differently here is write the number that’s hidden under the orange paper with cotton swabs dipped in the lemon juice and water mix. Ask the kids to calculate the number by ‘taking away’ the first digit from the answer, ‘taking away’ 7 from 10 in this case.

Hold the paper over a lit candle for the missing number to gradually reveal itself! The kids will be thrilled to bits to see their prediction appear magically on the paper! Please make necessary precaution and follow safety rules in the class while lighting the candle and holding the paper over it.